Activists color anti-coup Easter eggs

Anti-coup demonstrators in Myanmar decorated boiled eggs on Easter Sunday in the latest protest as the military junta continues its brutal crackdown.

This combination photo shows eggs decorated with messages in support of protesters demonstrating against the military coup in Yangon on April 4, 2021. AFP

Myanmar has been gripped by severe turmoil since a February 1 coup ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

Security forces have sought to quell a mass uprising with lethal force, with the death toll reaching 557 as of Saturday, according to local monitoring group Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP).

To coincide with Easter Sunday, scores of Myanmar protesters decorated eggs with political messages and left them on neighbour’s doorsteps and hanging in bags on front gates.

Pictures posted on social media showed eggs adorned with Suu Kyi’s likeness and three-finger salutes – a symbol of the resistance – while others said “save our people” and “democracy.”

One Facebook group promoting the egg protest urged people to be respectful of Christian traditions on Easter Sunday.

Early bird protesters also hit the streets of Mandalay Sunday, some carrying flags and riding motorbikes.

Their demonstration comes even after four protesters were killed Saturday in the cities of Bago and Monywa.

At least 2,658 civilians are in detention across the country, according to AAPP.

This weekend, Myanmar authorities issued arrest warrants for 40 celebrities – most of whom are in hiding.

Two sisters – Shine Ya Da Na Pyo and Nay Zar Chi Shine – who spoke with a CNN correspondent on Friday were also detained, along with another relative.

Local media reported they had flashed a three-finger salute while speaking to CNN.

“We are pressing the authorities for information on this, and for the safe release of any detainees,” a CNN spokesperson said.

Meanwhile, ten rebel groups held online talks Saturday about Myanmar’s crisis, fanning fears that a broader conflict could erupt in a country long plagued by fighting between the military and the ethnic armies.

The country’s 20 odd ethnic armed groups control large areas of territory, mostly in border regions.

Last week, the junta declared a month-long ceasefire with ethnic armed groups.

The announcement however has not seen the end of lethal force against anti-coup protesters.

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