How Youtube saved Brave Girls’ K-pop career


Members of  Brave Girls were losing courage just weeks ago, on the verge of breaking up and abandoning their dreams of K-pop stardom after years of going nowhere.

Then a pseudonymous YouTuber called Viditor uploaded a compilation of them performing on South Korean army bases — and saved their careers.

Just like the Brave Girls, scores of groups largely made up of teenagers are launched every year hoping to make it big on the K-pop scene, but most acts quickly disappear. 

“Rollin’ rollin’ rollin’ rollin’/I am waiting for you/Babe just only you,” they chant, as wildly enthusiastic uniformed conscripts dance and wave glow-sticks.

It went viral and struck millions of chords across the country.

Less than a month later the song reached number one in South Korea and topped the Billboard K-pop 100 in the US, four years after it was originally released — with their popularity reinforced by their story of struggle against the odds.

The fan-led ascent is a reversal of the usual K-pop model, where bands are usually assembled, trained intensively, and launched by record companies, whose marketing and promotion are crucial to their success.

COMMENT DISCLAIMER: Reader comments posted on this Web site are not in any way endorsed by Manila Standard. Comments are views by manilastandard.net readers who exercise their right to free expression and they do not necessarily represent or reflect the position or viewpoint of manilastandard.net. While reserving this publication’s right to delete comments that are deemed offensive, indecent or inconsistent with Manila Standard editorial standards, Manila Standard may not be held liable for any false information posted by readers in this comments section.





Source link

SHARE ME PLEASE!
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Reply