Nograles to DoST: Explore new uses of bamboo

A first-term member of the House of Representatives is set to start talks with the Department of Science and Technology to explore new uses of bamboo in livelihood projects.

Bamboos are now used in making handicraft, in constructing light structures and even food.

However, Rizal Rep. Juan Fidel Nograles said that more uses could still be found with adequate government support to make the propagation of the tree widespread to contain soil erosion and other ill effects of uncontrolled logging as well as mining activities.

With an end-goal of sustainable development, Nograles said he hoped to create value chains so that Rizal could be a bamboo-processing hub rather than just a possible source of raw materials.

“With the help of the national government, we can be provided with technology and technical know-how, as well as strategic partnerships with the private sector, to make bamboo a viable pillar in our pandemic recovery efforts.”

Nograles earlier launched Save Our Forests Now in December in the wake of Typhoon Ulysses, which laid waste to various towns in Rizal in November.

Hundred of students have been joining bamboo planting activities in various logged over parts of the province as well as watersheds. 

Nograles noted that attendance in bamboo planting activities had been increasing.

“I am glad that more young people have shown interest in joining the movement aimed at greening the town of Rodriguez and eventually the whole of Rizal province,” Nograles said.

“More of our youth are realizing their potential to be agents of change, and it is truly inspiring to witness them take our beloved province’s destiny into their own hands.”

“Because of the abundance of bamboo trees in Montalban (former name of Rodriguez), I want to use it as a means to push the livelihood of residents,” he added.

He also said he planned to provide skills training to residents who wish to rely on bamboo for their livelihood.

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